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Division Info and League Ages

Determining League Age The "league age" of your player may not be the age they are right now.  Enter their birthday in the League Age Calculator to learn the "league age" of your player.  

Division Information The ages listed below are the most typical for each division. The skill sets are what we would like to see in a best-case scenario. Many kids start playing for the first time in the division that is age appropriate for them. There could be an option to keep a player in a lower division or move the player up to a higher division outside of the ages listed here, depending on the skills they do have. Contact the player agent (see board member page for contact information) if there is a special circumstance you’d like considered.  Final decisions on player assignment are the purview of the league’s board of directors.

Tee Ball

Tee Ball is the entry level division for players, ages 4-6. The experience is grounded in fun, fitness, and fundamentals.  The Tee Ball Division is usually co-ed, but some seasons may be structured as a baseball or softball program. 

Tee Ball players use bats and balls designated specifically for use in this division. The roster size for a Tee Ball team averages 7-10 players, with a season featuring 1-2 practices per week and 1-2 games per week (almost always one on Saturday).

Parents are strongly encouraged to become involved in this entry level of Little League. The assistance of one adult per every 2 or 3 players is often needed during practice and games at this level to help the players keep focus, have fun, and keep learning some fundamentals!

After Tee Ball, player progression to the next division takes into consideration a combination of age, skill, and focus.  

Listening skills are important for any team sport, including tee ball. If a younger player (4-5 years old) cannot listen or follow directions, you might want to consider waiting until they are more mature before placing them in what could be a frustrating situation. Better to wait and have a good experience, than rush it and turn them off from baseball.

By the end of Tee Ball, a player should be able to properly grip a bat and hit a ball off a tee, run the bases in correct order, generally know how to field a ground ball, throw a ball correctly (e.g. “step and throw”), and have a general knowledge of the positions (first base, second base, shortstop, etc.). 

Expect about 3 “experiences” per week (1-2 practices, 1-2 games), with games lasting about 3-4 innings or about an hour. Practices are usually 45-60 minutes. Players should be able to focus for that amount of time, with some guidance and encouragement.

Players who are considering moving to Coach Pitch should practice hitting pitched balls (underhand is fine, overhand preferred) with an adult before moving to the next level. This can be done in the backyard or park (doesn’t have to be on a baseball field) and utilize non-baseballs (e.g. wiffle or tennis balls are perfect). The key here is for the player to continue to hone their grip, timing, and hand-eye coordination to some extent.

Minor Leagues - Coach-pitch and Player-pitch

Minor League for softball and baseball is for players ages 6-10 and is divided into a “Coach-pitch” program and “Player-pitch” program.  Roster sizes contain between 9 and 14 players depending on the number of players registering for each season and the willingness of volunteers to manage and coach teams.  11 or 12 players and 3 coaches per team is ideal. The diamond used is 60-foot between bases and the pitching distance is 46 feet for Baseball, 35 feet for Softball.

Coach-pitch usually consists of players ages 6 - 8.  6-year old's need to have played at least a year of tee ball before moving to coach pitch. 

Player-pitch usually consists of players ages 8 - 10. Most players normally have played at least 2 years of coach-pitch before advancing to player-pitch.  

Parents are strongly encouraged to become involved in this level of Little League. Even if not volunteering as a coach, assistance is still welcome with practices and umpiring games.  

Coach pitch players are expected to be able to do/know the following: how to properly grip a bat and hit a pitched ball (at least, occasionally), know where each base is (e.g., which base is 1st, 2nd, 3rd - in order), know the positions on the field (infield and outfield), be able to run the bases in order and know to overrun 1st base on a single. Be able to field a ground ball and throw it to a teammate (with a 2 or 3-finger grip) with some accuracy. Players should be able to catch a thrown ball with some regularity (with two hands). Coach pitch players should have some experience in fielding (not necessarily catching) a fly ball. Players should also have a general understanding of the game (e.g., know the difference between a tag and force play) and know how to make a defensive play (even if they can’t physically execute it). Experienced players (e.g., 8 y/o) should be able to demonstrate leadership and role model skills to the younger (6-7 y/o) players through their words and actions (including and especially listening!).   

Listening and teammate skills begin to become more important in this division, so players should be willing and able to listen to coaches and try drills/exercises. Expect 1-2 practices per week, as well as 1-2 games, almost always an activity (practice or game) every Saturday. Games are usually ~4-5 innings, or about 90 minutes, so players should be able to focus for that amount of time.

At the minors (player pitch) level, the primary difference is obviously that kids are now pitching. Players here should have at least 1, but preferably 2 seasons of hitting pitched balls (no tee). Umpires are now used, and balls and strikes will be called, so players will walk and strike out (swinging or looking). Not all players can pitch, but most players should be able and willing to try and learn. Baserunning skills emerge, so players should know when to run (e.g., forced on a ground ball) and when not to (e.g., fly ball or not forced). They should be able to take direction from base coaches, including other teammates. Throwing skills should be accurate (somewhat) in that they’re throwing in the right direction and attempting “to make plays.”  Players need to be able to field ground balls and catch fly balls on a semi-regular basis. Players begin exhibiting leadership skills at this level, and should be able to work with their teammates - e.g., “picking them up” when they fail and cheering them on throughout the game and regardless of outcome. Listening skills and attention continues to become critical - games are 6 innings (usually) and can last up to 2 hours. Expect at least 2 practices per week, and 1-2 games; again, almost every Saturday. Pitchers and catchers may have extra side work.

The skills above for Coach Pitch and Player Pitch are what we would like to see in a best-case scenario, but many kids that are age-appropriate start playing baseball and softball at these divisions. Being a “Coachable” player is that most important skill if starting at these levels.   

Major Leagues 

Major Leagues for softball and baseball are for players ages 10 -12, though 10 year olds most often are best suited for Minor League play.  In the Major league division, teams incorporate more advanced baseball strategy - see below for player expectations.  Roster sizes contain between 9 and 14 players depending on the number of players registering for each season and the willingness of volunteers to manage and coach teams.  11 or 12 players per team is ideal. The diamond used is 60-foot between bases and and the pitching distance is 46 feet, 40 feet for Softball

Parents are strongly encouraged to become involved in this level of Little League. Even if not volunteering as a coach, assistance is still welcome with practices and umpiring games. 

Players at this level not only need to have the physical skills to play, but also a solid knowledge of the game. Pitchers continue to throw at a quicker pace and become more accurate. Runners should know how to read a sign and steal a base; defensive players should know how to throw/tag a runner out and do so regularly. Other advanced rules come into play (e.g. uncaught third strike, bunts) so players need to have a good grasp of the fundamentals of the game and ability to take signs from coaches. Players should be able to field ground and fly balls regularly, and be able to throw with reasonable accuracy to the correct location, given the situation. Skilled players should be able to execute (or at least know how to) a double-play on defense. Batters should be comfortable hitting pitched balls from opponents and have good fundamentals (e.g. grip, stance, swing, sight, etc.) with limited guidance. Defensive players should know which plays are applicable given a situation (e.g. number of outs, location of runners, etc.).

Expect 2-3 practices per week and 2-3 games. Games are 6 innings and can last up to 2 hours.

50/70 Baseball

This baseball division is for players 12-13.  50/70 offers a transition between the 60 foot base paths of the Major division and the 90 foot base paths of the Junior division. A transition in pitching distance is also provided between the 46 foot distance in the Major division and the 60.5 foot distance in the Junior division.  The 50/70 baseball diamond utilizes a 50 foot pitching distance and 70 foot base paths.

Many of the Junior League rules are used such as runners being permitted to lead off bases, runners may attempt to steal at any time, and allowing an on-deck batter.

The formation of 50/70 teams and Junior teams varies from year to year, depending on the number of players who register each season and their ages.

Parents are strongly encouraged to become involved in this level of Little League. Even if not volunteering as a coach, assistance is still welcome with practices and umpiring games. 

This level represents the beginning of “real” baseball - the only thing different* from this level and MLB rules are the size of the diamond and number of innings in a game (7). Players should have “heads up” skills on offense and defense - they should know what they’re doing before the play begins, and be able to execute once the play commences. Pitchers begin to develop off speed pitches (e.g. curveballs, changeups, etc.) and begin to obtain a command of the strike zone. Pitchers can balk at this level, so they need to have solid mechanics on the mound. Runners can lead, steal, and do everything in between (e.g. tag up on sacrifice fly balls, etc.). Defensive players must be able to field ground and fly balls routinely and make accurate throws to the correct location without guidance. Batters should be able to take signs from the coaches and execute in situations (e.g. bunt, hit-and-run, etc.)

Expect 2-3 practices and 1-2 games per week. Games can last up to 2+ hours; double-headers are common, especially on Saturdays. 

Junior and Senior Divisions - Baseball

The Junior Division is for 13–14 year old's who are ready to play on the “big” (90-foot) diamond. The Senior Division is for 13 - 16 year old's.  The rules here are essentially the same as what you see at MLB, with the exception* of pitch counts for player safety and number of innings in a game (7). Players at this level are generally on the path to play at the high school level and are expected to know all skills independently. Coaching at this level is generally concerned with strategy and some “tweaking” to a player’s skill set, but all players should be able to execute at all dimensions of the game - batting, fielding, running. Pitchers continue to develop off-speed pitches and take signals from catchers/coaches. Pitchers have greater command of the strike zone than the 50/70 intermediate level, in spite of being further away (60 vs. 50 feet). Pitch speeds continue to increase and can approach 60+ mph for some exceptional pitchers. Catchers should be able to throw the ball to second base on 1 hop or less, with reasonable accuracy. Fielders should be able to adjust to errant throws and recover (e.g., scoop, backhand, block, etc.). Baserunners need to know how to take primary and secondary leads, as well as steal and slide. 

Parents are strongly encouraged to become involved in this level of Little League. Even if not volunteering as a coach, assistance is still welcome with practices and umpiring games. 

Expect 2-3 practices and 1-3 games per week. Games can last up to 2+ hours; double-headers are common, especially on Saturdays.


*Note for all Divisions: for player safety, pitch counts are limited for all pitchers under 18 years old. The number of pitches allowed and days of rest vary depending on division in Baseball. In Softball, players are limited on the number of innings they can pitch instead of the number of actual pitches.

Player Grants

The T-Mobile Little League Call Up Grant offers a simple-to-use application to cover the cost of registration fees for families in need. 

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